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Archive for the tag “Maya PETA”

Using Bigotry to Defend Theft and Killing — Well Done, PETA

Yesterday I spent a few hours reading through the latest court documents in the lawsuit against PETA (you know the one I mean, the one against them because they stole and killed a little girl’s dog). Predictably, it’s full of lies and half truths and, man, are PETA’s lawyers snarky. But what really got under my skin is PETA’s attempt to smear Maya’s family. This is typical PETA behavior — they’re bullies and anyone who dares stand up to them becomes a target, which I know from personal experience. But what is especially heinous about this particular smearing is the not so subtle racism and xenophobia they’re employing. I guess I shouldn’t have been too surprised, since PETA supporters also employ bigotry in order to try to silence truth tellers, and PETA never steps in to put a stop to it. But, holy hell, it’s low.

Time and time again Wilbur Zarate, the father of Cynthia, the little girl whose dog PETA stole and killed, was asked about his citizenship status, the citizenship status of his family members, the status of his green card by PETA’s attorney during his deposition. He even went so far as to ask if Cynthia was born in the US or in Mexico. Because Mr. Zarate’s citizenship status is relevant to the fact that PETA stole and killed his little girl’s dog how? From the beginning PETA has stated that the Zarate family is suing them in order to make money, which is offensive but not a shocking thing for them to say. But to bring into all of this the heritage of the Zarate family is a bridge too far even for PETA.

Here’s what I see: I see a massive labyrinth of an organization trying to shut up by any means necessary the one family — the ONE — who has dared stand up to PETA. I see PETA stating that Mr. Zarate is only after money and then, in order to further smear him, question his citizenship status. And here’s the larger picture — I see PETA asserting that anyone whose native language is Spanish, and/or is of Mexican heritage, can and should have their citizenship status questioned. Because, why the hell not? And, geez, if someone is in the US illegally how dare they stand up for their family, right? Some folks are just supposed to sit down, roll over, and ignore it when heinous things happen. Here’s what I see as PETA’s primary message to Mr. Zarate — “don’t you know your place?”

When you stole and killed a little girl’s dog, and it’s just the latest smoking gun in a pattern of behavior going back nearly twenty years, THIS is all you have left. The emperor has no clothes, so you throw everything you can at the victim. You know, the guy whose little girl’s dog was stolen and killed contrary to Virginia law. A dog who was not the only animal killed that day. The fact that PETA is using bigotry and xenophobia in order to defend themselves is offensive and shocking — as is the fact that the day of Maya’s death was just another day at the office for PETA employees. And keep talking, PETA, because the more your representatives say the more they reveal the moral wasteland at your core.

More Questions Surrounding PETA’s 2015 Stats

I’m in no mood to fight the PETA battles today but something vitally important was just published — and it’s all based on the statistics of PETA and other area animal agencies.

PETA, Where Are the Missing Animals” is the title of the blog piece just published by Nathan Winograd. Mr. Winograd broke down some numbers — self-reported by PETA to the state of Virginia — and, unlike PETA, numbers don’t lie.

In 2015, PETA claims to have transferred 446 animals to other “Virginia Releasing Agencies,” and it lists on it’s VDACS paperwork where each animal was supposed to have gone. However, Mr. Winograd also has the numbers for the other VA agencies and this is where the massive red flag comes in because the numbers don’t add up. The entire blog is vital information for anyone who cares about animals so I encourage everyone reading this to read it. For now, let’s look at some of the most glaring red flags.

First,  the records for the Peninsula Regional Animal Shelter. According to PETA’s records, they transferred 7 dogs and 27 cats to PRAS. According to PRAS they received exactly this number of animals from PETA: 0. In fact, they didn’t receive any animals at all from any other shelters. So where are those 34 animals PETA claims to have transferred to PRAS? It’s possible, I suppose that PRAS would list any animals it receives from PETA as being an “owner surrender” but, considering there is a nice big column for “Animals Received from Another Virginia Releasing Agency,” and PETA is a licensed animal shelter, it doesn’t seem likely.

Here’s another Mr. Winograd points out, Norfolk Animal Care Center:

Likewise, while PETA claims it sent 70 cats, 22 dogs, and two “other companion animals” to the Norfolk Animal Care Center, Norfolk reports taking in only 61 cats, 31 dogs, and two “other companion animals” from Chesapeake Animal Control and Virginia Beach Animal Control. It does not report taking in any from PETA.

So now we’re up to 128 missing animals. Where are those 128 animals? 128 cats, dogs, and “other” animals. We know, again by PETA’s own numbers, that they killed 1,502 animals in 2015. And we know that we have 128 missing cats, dogs, and “other”s. 128 animals don’t just go missing from a shelter, something happened to them. And if we know these animals are missing because there are no records of them at the agencies they were supposed to have been transferred to how do we know all the other animals PETA claims it transferred to area shelters were really transferred? How do we know they’re not just missing too? Again, Mr. Winograd has some possible explanations for the number discrepancies so please read his blog.

Let’s say PETA actually did make a clerical error to the tune of 128 animals, hypothetically. What does that say about their capabilities? It’s pretty dismal. And how does that reflect upon their other record keeping abilities?

The more sinister explanation, of course, is that PETA falsified their records to keep their already outrageous kill rates just a little less outrageous. I assume it’s illegal to falsify state records? Obviously, we can’t prove this is what happened to the 128 animals who are unaccounted for, right now this is just a question mark. But, man, that’s one hell of a question mark.

 

 

 

 

I Stand With Maya — and With the Family Seeking Justice for Her

Maya, a tiny slip of a dog, and a family who loves her may just be the ones finally able to shed light into the darkness of PETA. Just over a year ago Maya was stolen off her porch and killed. Not by dog fighters or a person who enjoys harming animals, or any other of the usual suspects, but by the largest animal rights group in the world — PETA. And now Maya’s family is suing PETA, and the two women who stole and killed Maya, for upwards of $9.7 million dollars.

Even as much as I know about Maya and what happened to her I learned new things from reading the suit, which you can read here.

  • On the same day PETA stole and killed Maya, who belonged to the Zarate family, they also appear to have stolen and killed a dog who belonged to Mr. Zarate’s niece.
  • While I suspected the women who stole and killed Maya were the same women who had been working to gain the trust of the Zarate family and others at the trailer park where they lived the lawsuit confirms it: “Carey and Wood came to the Park and began to ingratiate themselves with the residents in order to build trust with the residents.” PETA has claimed that Maya’s theft and death were the result of mistaken identity, that the women thought she was a different dog. These women who spent time gaining the trust of the Zarate family, who spent time with Maya, didn’t realize that the dog they first tried to lure off the Zarate porch and then snatched off the porch, was Maya? It’s utterly ridiculous and now we know that these these women knew Maya, they knew the Zarate family, I assume they knew Cynthia, the little girl who adored Maya. And after grooming this family in order to gain their trust, much the way human predators groom their prey, they stole and killed their dog.
  • Carey and Wood “told residents that they would be trying to find good homes for the dogs they captured.” Which is exactly what PETA says in order to gain custody of the animals they then kill. They don’t say this because they honestly are going to attempt to re-home animals, they say this because they know nobody will hand over animals if they know the animals will be immediately killed. That’s the pattern of behavior. It’s what I was told to do when I worked for PETA, it’s what PETA employees are still doing. By any means necessary.
  • Mr. Zarate, who had installed a security camera on his porch that ended up capturing Maya’s theft, believes that when PETA representatives came to his house to apologize for killing his dog they had ulterior motives. “During the visit, the PETA representatives asked about the video and were visually searching for the camera. It was apparent to Wilber that the real purpose of the visit was for PETA to ascertain the location of the security camera and to learn the extent to which PETA’s illegal actions had been captured on video.” This makes perfect sense — they weren’t actually sorry for stealing and killing Maya, they were assessing how much damage control would be required.
  • “PETA believed that given the socio-economic status of the residents, PETA could take the pets and kill them without any repercusssion to PETA.” Absolutely. There is a reason they target people who don’t have a lot of resources — because those are the people less able to fight back.

As a mother this is the part of the lawsuit that pulled at me: “Cynthia experienced extensive and severe emotional distress. Among other things, she cried for weeks, became lethargic, lost sleep, refrained from eating and lost weight.” I have watched my children grieve for both animals and humans, I have watched one of my children experience the trauma of being badly bullied, I have watched my children as they say goodbye to people they know they will likely never see again. All of this hurts, all of it makes me want to wrap my children in my arms and shield them from any further pain and suffering. After reading Cynthia’s reaction to Maya being stolen and killed I felt myself relating to Mr. Zarate on a different level — not just as someone who knows he’s speaking the truth but as a parent who has watched her children suffer. And my heart just hurts for him, and for Cynthia.

This family who PETA thought would never be able to fight them is doing what few people have the courage to do — they are standing up to a Goliath of an organization that is known to sink to the lowest depths in order to stop anyone who dares to speak the truth about them, they are standing up for a beloved family member, they are standing up for the pain a child has had inflicted upon her. I hope that this lawsuit will finally convince other past employees to come forward to add their voices to the truth the Zarate family is speaking. I know there must be former employees who are also parents — think of what it would mean to you if someone hurt your child as badly as Cynthia has been hurt. Wouldn’t you do absolutely everything you could in order to fight for your child? Wouldn’t you hope others who could help in that fight would stand by you? They are battling a powerful opponent who has deep pockets and wouldn’t it be wonderful if everyone who knows the truth about PETA spoke out in support of this family? I, for one, will continue to do that. I will continue to stand for Maya, for Cynthia, for a father who has had to watch his child grieve a terrible betrayal and loss, and for Black Boy. You have my full support and admiration, Mr. Zarate, and you are an example to my children of what it means to do the right thing even when it’s the difficult thing. Thank you.

 

The Thread That Binds for PETA: Death

PETA is still in very hot water over its support of Breed Specific Legislation and is trying mightily to spin the truth. But the truth is the truth, we must keep our focus on it. And this is the truth — when you dig deep into the way their actions impact companion animals you can see that they have one common thread — animals end up dead.

Let’s just get some facts out there.

First Fact: During the months of July, August, and September, PETA took in 630 animals and 490 of those animals were killed. You can find a statement by Virginia Senator Bill Stanley about those numbers here. Sadly, these are typical numbers for PETA. In 2014 they took in 2,631 animals and killed 2,324. You can find more information about their shockingly high kill rate here.

Second Fact: PETA kills adoptable animals without ever trying to rehome them. I know this from my firsthand experience as a PETA field worker. We know this because of Maya, the dog they killed shortly after stealing her from her home. We know this because of the animals in North Carolina who were killed in a PETA van and whose bodies were dumped like trash. Patrick Proctor, a veterinarian who asked PETA to find homes for a mother cat and her kittens, stated of their deaths

This is ethical? I don’t think so.

PETA states that its kill rate is so high because they provide a free humane euthanasia service for people whose animals are suffering. Was Maya suffering? Were the mother and babies suffering? Were all the animals found in the dumpster suffering? Are people still naive enough to believe that?

Third Fact: PETA advocated for all dogs seized from Michael Vick to be killed, stating that saving them was not “a good use of money” or time. Now, I may be missing something but last time I checked the purpose of animal rescue was to rescue animals, not to write them off as a waste.

Fourth fact: PETA supports Breed Specific Legislation, they have for years. Since recently partnering with some vehemently anti-pit bull groups — Dogsbite.org and Daxter’s Friends to name two — PETA has been getting hammered on social media sites. Their feeds on Facebook and Twitter are full of people who are rightly outraged that an “animal rights group” has decided to align itself with organizations who have as their main objective the annihilation of any dog with a certain appearance. Let’s get this straight, you cannot call yourself an animal rights group and work with people who refer to dead pit bulls as “pit bull dog meat” or who write diatribes about the different ways to kill pit bull type dogs. And you cannot call yourself ethical when you partner with people who assert that folks who have pit bulls only do so for the purposes of fighting and bestiality. You can see examples of those statements here. These are some real winners PETA has chosen as friends.

Fifth Fact: BSL is BSL no matter how you spin it. In what I can only assume is an attempt at damage control, PETA has decided to stop using the term “Breed Specific Legislation” and start using the term “Breed Specific Protection.” But we’re just going to keep calling what they’re endorsing what it actually is — Breed Specific Legislation. In order to defend their support of BSL PETA has stated that their actual objective is to promote the spaying and neutering of pit bulls. The problem is that BSL and the promotion of spaying and neutering aren’t the same thing — they may overlap in that spaying and neutering can be a tiny part of BSL but BSL is so much bigger. Spaying and neutering saves lives, BSL results in death — just look to Colorado as an example of this. PETA asserts they support BSL because it is in the best interest of dogs. If that were true why are they the only major animal welfare/rights organization supporting it? The National Canine Research Council has an extensive list of groups who oppose BSL, as well as research that proves it is not effective in reducing dog bites.

What is the common thread that binds all of these facts? Killing. It sounds harsh, especially when we’re talking about a group that is considered to be one of the staunchest defenders of the lives of animals. But ultimately, when all those facts are boiled down to their bare bones, the common thread is killing. Dogs who were tortured and forced to fight are called a waste of resources. Maya, a healthy and loved chihuahua, was stolen and killed. Thousands upon thousands of animals have died at the hands of PETA employees. And we’re to believe that they were all too ill or old or aggressive to save? Seriously? Does any of that reflect an organization that values life? No — it reflects an organization who believes animals are better off dead than living with humans and that is a supremely twisted philosophy.

Questions About Its Shelter that PETA Can’t Seem to Answer

It always seems the more I think about PETA the more questions surface. The other day I had an exchange on Twitter with Mary Tully, who claims not to work for PETA, just to know a lot about them. She even has a website dedicated to them, with a special category for those who are telling the truth about their killing practices. I’ve linked to it once in the past but I’m not going to do that again because I don’t want to give her any more air and energy than is absolutely necessary. The only reason I’m writing about her now is because I asked her a number of questions during our Twitter exchange — despite claiming to have done an enormous amount of research on PETA, despite being someone PETA consistently refers people to when they have questions about their shelter, she was unable to adequately answer any of them. So I figured I’d write them and others down here, and just keep asking them.

In 2014 PETA received 2,631 cats and dogs and killed 2,324. They found homes for 39. PETA claims its kill numbers are so high because its shelter is one of “last resort,” taking in only sick, elderly, suffering animals, and that animals who don’t fit into those categories are usually transferred to other shelters. There are a lot of problems and questions with that assertion, and that leads to my first batch of questions —

  • What is the process by which animals are evaluated? Any good shelter will have a very detailed and thorough evaluation process, one that is used for every animal admitted to the shelter. Ms. Tully told me each animal was evaluated as an individual so decisions are made on a case by case basis. Great, as it should be. Also, not what I asked. Here is an example of a behavioral evaluation form a shelter might use for dogs, here’s one for cats. Here’s a medical assessment form. The website where I found the forms is from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, it states

Behavioral evaluations involve obtaining as much information as possible about the animal entering your shelter, including his/her behavior prior to relinquishment and his/her behavior while in your facility. The more information you gather about an animal’s behavior, the more able you will be to make sound decisions about its disposition.

Precisely. Because the more we know about an animal the better we can determine what steps will be taken with the animal. One of the claims PETA makes about Maya, the chihuahua who was stolen from her porch by PETA employees and promptly killed, was that she was mistaken for another dog who had been surrendered to them. There are so many things wrong with this statement, and so many questions surrounding it, some of which I addressed in this blog, but for today’s purposes let’s just ask some specific ones.

  • Even if Maya was mistaken for another dog, is it PETA policy to not verify with the person surrendering an animal that the right animal has been taken into PETA custody? I’ve been told that the woman who surrendered the dog for which they say Maya was mistaken wasn’t home at the time and that’s why they couldn’t verify her identity. Which leads to another question …
  • Is it PETA policy to kill an animal without first verifying his/her identity? You’d think, when something like the life of an animal is on the line, PETA would want to be 100% positive that they have the correct animal before killing him/her. Which leads to another question …
  • Does PETA take an owner at their word that an animal is sick/aggressive/suffering, etc? Or does it do its own evaluation of the condition of the animal? When surrendering animals people make up all sorts of stories — the dog is aggressive, the cat won’t stop peeing out of the box, the dog belongs to my neighbor and he doesn’t want it, you get the idea — in order to make themselves look better, or feel better, or to rid the neighborhood of a dog who won’t stop barking, and many other countless justifications. Which is part of the reason shelters have their own, independent processes in order to verify or prove false the information. What are PETA’s?
  • How is it determined that an animal is too ill to save? Because there are a lot of shelters and rescues with a lot fewer resources who save very sick animals. Patrick the pitbull is a very good example of this. Patrick was thrown down a garbage chute, he was starving and close to death. Here’s what he looked like shortly after his rescue

Here’s what he looks like now that he’s been nurtured back to health

I’ll give you another example, our dog, Firu. Firu was a Costa Rican street dog, he was hit by a car who slammed into him so hard that his femur was snapped in half and his hip was dislocated, he was left to die alone by the side of the road. A woman I think of as one of his guardian angels picked him up and brought him to a shelter. I’ve spoken extensively about FIru to his other guardian angel –the woman who runs the shelter. Her first thought wasn’t “let’s put this dog out of his misery,” it was “let’s save this dog.” In addition to being broken physically he was malnourished and weak, they weren’t sure he could be saved but they began to try — through love and medical care they succeeded. This is a shelter that sees the most ill, most emotionally and physically broken, animals you can imagine. And they save them. And they do it with a lot fewer resources than PETA has. Here’s our Firu today

Firu

I understand that there are circumstances under which an animal really cannot be saved — they truly are gravely ill, or there truly are not the resources to nurture them back to health. I don’t think those cases would add up to 2,324 dead animals in one year by one organization.

Which leads to another question

  • What is PETA’s euthanasia policy? When I asked for PETA’s euthanasia policy Ms. Tully provided me with this:

Which, of course, isn’t a euthanasia policy, it’s a FB comment. HUGE difference. Here’s an example of a stated euthanasia policy from the Baltimore Humane Society.

Here are some other questions I asked that I still don’t have answers for:

  • What kind of documentation is offered about the condition of animals PETA receives? You would think, especially since PETA is under such close scrutiny for its “shelter” practices, it would carefully document through things like medical examinations, photographs, and forms the conditions of animals. Quite some time ago Ms. Tully, through a comment on my blog, told me this

Any member of the public can walk into any Virginia public or private animal shelter and request to see any animal custody records that was generated in the previous five years.

One would assume documentation of the condition of the animal would be included in those custody records. More questions:

  • What are PETA’s adoption standards and requirements?
  • What kind of adoption counseling is provided to those adopting?
  • What kind of adoption contract is used?
  • What are PETA’s shelter hours? Where are those hours posted? Ms. Tully told me they were posted at PETA but I’ve been told otherwise by residents of Hampton Roads, I’d like proof that there are indeed hours posted specifically for the” shelter” at PETA.
  • Is the “shelter” easily accessible to the public? Again, I have been told that, in order to visit the shelter, one must go to the receptionist and then wait for a specific person to come get you and bring you into the four or five holding rooms they have. Seems a pretty complicated, and non-transparent, process for a shelter. Most shelters are easily accessible because they want people to visit them and to visit the animals they have available for adoption. This seems not to be the case with PETA. Why?

So, those are the questions I’m asking for now, I’d encourage others to ask them as well. Especially if you are still supporting PETA, still giving money to them. Questions are not an indictment in and of themselves, they’re just questions. And these are questions that should be easily answered — which is why it’s troubling that PETA, and a woman to whose website they consistently refer people for answers about their “shelter,” can’t seem to adequately do that.

A List of Ways You Can Fight PETA’s Killing Machine

I was a little over ten miles into my run yesterday, I’d been pacing myself to hit fifteen — I was feeling strong and focused. At least until a sudden, worrying pain in my right calf shocked me out of my zone. I stopped running, stretched, walked, started running, the pain shot through my calf again. I stopped, cursed, started, and the pain said “are you insane? STOP!” So I did, because I’ve learned the hard way that running through pain is a very foolish thing. I felt pretty fricking robbed though. I still do. And it’s made me edgy.

Halfway through a cut throat game of Go Fish with our two youngest, our middle child noticed that my leg was taped and wrapped. She got a look on her face that was something between absolute horror and panic and said “Are you injured?” I told her yes, I just didn’t know how badly. She started shaking her head and said “Oh no! Oh God! Oh no! Oh Jesus! NO!” While she can be prone to dramatics, in this case, her reaction was completely warranted because this is not an exaggeration:

Injured runner may bite

Right now I’m trying not to project into the future, or worry about how long this injury will have me out. I’m trying to focus on taking care of my body, letting it heal, and not feeling slightly homicidal. And I’ve got some time on my hands, because I’m supposed to be running right now. So I wanted to blog about ways you can take action in order to help ensure that the recently passed Virginia Bill SB 1381, which will prevent PETA from killing the majority of animals it takes in, is implemented in a timely manner. Along with some other actions you can take.

Currently Virginia is stating that it will take two years to implement this bill. Two years! My husband works for the federal government so I have firsthand understanding about why the wheels of bureaucracy sometimes turn slowly, and I get that change does not happen overnight. But two years? Come on. Considering the fact that lives are on the line that is utterly unacceptable.

So, here’s what you can do, both to advocate for a more efficient time table and to hold PETA accountable. First, you can read this FB post by Nathan Winograd. In it he reminds us why this fight is so important, and he gives us email addresses for people we can contact about speeding up the implementation of SB 1381. That’s the second thing you can do — email them. Let them know, respectfully but forcefully, why taking two years to implement this bill is not acceptable. I’ll cut to the chase for you, here’s their contact information:

1. Sandra Adams, the Commissioner for Agriculture: sandy.adams@vdacs.virginia.gov

2. Dr. Carolyn Bissett, the State Veterinarian: carolyn.bissett@vdacs.virginia.gov

You know who else you can email? Daphna Nachminovitch, a PETA Senior Vice-President and the person who heads up the Community Animal Project — the folks who do the field work in Hampton Roads and beyond. Let her know, again respectfully (because nastiness gets us nowhere ) but forcefully, what you think of PETA’s better off dead mentality. Her email address is daphnan@peta.org.

Thirdly, if you live in the Hampton Roads area, or if you feel like taking a road trip, go to PETA headquarters. Their address is 501 Front Street, Norfolk. Go to the receptionist, tell her that you are requesting to see custody records of all the animals they’ve taken in for the last five years. Under Virginia law they must provide you with them. You’ll have to look at them on the property, which is a bummer, but that’s the law. Look for red flags (7 pound kittens, anyone?), holes in stories, clues to the truth. In all likelihood they will hem and haw, they will tell you that the person you need to talk to isn’t available, isn’t in the building, blah, blah, blah. I was told by a blogger to whom PETA consistently refers people in order to explain away why they kill that it is your legal right to request and examine animal custody records. So stand firm, don’t let them bully you. Because they love to do that, it’s what goes on. But behind every bully is fear and cowardice, it’s no different with PETA. And don’t let them fool you, don’t fall for their lines about their shelter being a “shelter of last resort.” Maya was a healthy, well adjusted, young animal and, after they stole her off of her family’s porch, they killed her. Along with the other animals they picked up that day. Ask them why, and don’t buy the rogue employee line, it’s a lie.

Another thing you can do, if you’re in the Hampton Roads area, is head on down to PETA and tell them you want to visit their shelter. Again, they will hem and haw. But, seriously, what kind of shelter doesn’t want to show off its animals to potential adopters? If you’re not in the area, or can’t make a trip to headquarters, give them a ring (757-622-7382) and ask for their hours, their standards for adoption, ask about the animals they have available. If you’re feeling feisty you can ask them about the animals they’ve killed. Or, if you’d rather, email them about it, here’s the contact form from their website. Let them know what you think about their better off dead mentality.

Utilize social media, it’s one of our greatest assets. Go to their FB page and ask why they have a 1% adoption rate. Why, over the past 12 years, they’ve killed 31,250 animals. Why, despite the fact that they took in over $51 million dollars in 2014, they only managed to adopt out 39 animals. These are numbers they submitted to the state of Virginia, hold them accountable. Take screen shots of your questions because they love to scrub their FB page and block people who confront them. Tweet at them, tweet at others, tweet at celebrities who support them, utilize hash tags like #PetaDeathCult.

And tell your friends and family the truth! I’ve had so many people let me know that they’ve spread the truth and were greeted with shock, then anger — not at them but at PETA. Because people feel betrayed, sickened, duped. And they should — what PETA does to the companion animals it takes in is sick, and folks should feel betrayed by an organization that promotes compassion out of one side of its mouth and killing out of the other.

For quite some time I have been asking former PETA employees to step out of the shadows and speak the truth. Many have done so anonymously, and their stories have been meticulously documented in this piece by Nathan Winograd. I know, to some, speaking anonymously may not seem like much but it takes courage to speak up, even anonymously. Their testimony is invaluable, and their truths have shed more light on the killing that happens behind the closed doors of PETA, it validates what we know. I hope some of them choose to come forward and attach their names to their truths. But they’re not the only ones who can take action — each of us can take action, each of us can be a voice for the voiceless and someone who stands between PETA and animals who are at risk.

I am determined to see this through. I am determined to see change happen. I am determined to hold PETA accountable. I will not back down, I will not stop speaking the truth. And I’m a little cranky so I’m kind of in my “oh yea, it’s on …” mode.

So this is my theme song …

And this is my mindset …

Never provoke an injured runner

Let’s go …

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